Ross Valley Winery – A Millennial Favorite Tasting Room

Angela Photo(By guest author, Angela Atkinson)  One of my favorite winery tasting rooms is a small, locally owned and operated winery in downtown San Anselmo.  It has provided customers with some great wines since 1987. The winery has a warm and inviting tasting room in the front, but behind the scenes in back is where the alchemy happens — truly a very cool place. The tasting room has a large vaulted ceiling giving in an open and spacious feeling while still feeling welcoming and unique. There is a small retail area with bottle openers, stoppers, and art from local artists.

At the Ross Valley Winery, Zinfandel, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and Sauvignon Blanc, and more are sold at reasonable prices.  The nose and palate of the various wines provide a unique combintation of fruits, floral and spices combining to catch the pallet in a rare and uncommon pleasure — though, of course, they are all made of wine grapes.  Nothing else added, except for a little oak on the reds.  Ross Valley Winery also mades a Meade, which is comprised of honey, and a Port, which is fortified with grape spirits.

Paul Kreider, the owner and winemaker, is a walking encyclopedia of wine and winemaking. After devoting the better half of his life to making wine, he has begun offering his knowledge to his apprentice in hopes of teacher her some of his tricks. Her wines are also rare and delicious engaging all of the senses to create drinkable art.   I really like this winery and encourage my friends and family to visit.

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One Response to Ross Valley Winery – A Millennial Favorite Tasting Room

  1. Bob Stanley says:

    I was truly surprised by the quality and greatly enjoyed the Ross Valley Meade at a November 2009 “Savory Thymes” Wild Game Feast and fundraiser for an intriguing, “dark and steamy” documentary called “Swamp Cabbage”.

    I tend to prefer a dry reds and have not enjoyed the few meades I’ve tried in the past. The dry meade served at the Wild Game Feast was wonderfully subtle, dry, balanced, with unique and interesting flavors that included (to my idiosyncratic palate) white maple and very mild fennel. Great work and keep it up!

    Bob

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